Measurement

Standard Area 2.3: Measurement and Estimation
Pre-Kindergarten – Grade 2

1. Once Upon a Dime: A Math Adventure by Nancy Kelly Allen, 1999
Farmer Worth discovers that a special tree on his farm produces different kinds of money, depending on what animal fertilizer he uses.

2. One Grain of Rice: a Mathematical Folktale by Demi, 1997
A reward of one grain of rice doubles day by day into millions of grains of rice when a selfish raja is outwitted by a clever village girl.

Standard Area 2.3: Measurement and Estimation
Grade 3 – Grade 5

1. If You Hopped Like a Frog by David M. Schwartz, 1999
Introduces the concept of ratio by comparing what humans would be able to do if they had bodies like different animals.

2. Full House: An Invitation to Fractions by Dayle Ann Dodds, 2009
“Miss Bloom runs the Strawberry Inn, and she loves visitors. All through the day she welcomes a cast of hilarious characters until all the rooms are taken. It’s a full house! But in the middle of the night, Miss Bloom senses that something is amiss — and sure enough, the guests are all downstairs eating dessert. Readers will be inspired to do the math and discover that one delicious cake divided by five hungry guests and one doting hostess equals a perfect midnight snack at the Strawberry Inn.” (Amazon book description)

3. Tiger Math: Learning to Graph from a Baby Tiger by Ann Whitehead Nagda, 2002
“T.J., a Siberian tiger cub born at the Denver Zoo, is orphaned when he is only a few weeks old. The veterinary staff raises him, feeding him by hand until he is able to eat on his own and be returned to the tiger exhibit. The story is accompanied by graphs on facing pages that chart T.J.’s growth, successfully showing math in “real world” terms. The first charts show how few Siberian tigers remain in the wild and in captivity, helping to establish the importance of saving this one. The doctors need to know how much the young animal eats and how much weight he gains in order to make sure he is healthy.” (Amazon book description).  Ann Whitehead Nagda wrote other math concept books that are worth checking out.

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